Christchurch water referendum

tppa-march-100916-crop

Media Release: CommunityVoice.NZ

15 September, 2016

Canterbury residents soon have their first say on regional governance for nine years. Limited elections to Environment Canterbury will put seven local councilors at the decision-making table from October 2016. These will be joined by up to six government appointees, some of them current commissioners, including two representing Ngai Tahu iwi.

Of foremost concern is water conservation for equitable and future use. With water-borne illness on the rise in the region and nationally, pressure is on to maintain accustomed water quality. This is affected by quantities of water allocated for a range of different purposes.

“The Canterbury Water Management Strategy is very much needed,” says Christchurch ECan candidate Rik Tindall. “It shows how fundamental democracy is to solving ‘wicked’ challenges like water – shares must be fairly negotiated and enforced, including for natural environment.”

“Everyone has a right, protected by health legislation, to safe and sufficient drinking water. Biodiversity – flora and fauna – must be considered too. People want agency in these things.”

The CWMS consults locally, through each river catchment Zone Committee, to write a Zone Implementation Plan for meeting all needs in each respective catchment.

“Democracy is essential for reaching the best outcomes, for optimisation at every level of the Canterbury water management strategy,” Tindall says. “The public are very concerned that water standards are slipping, that environment is degraded, and it is not apparent that removal of democracy has been helping with these issues in Canterbury. Quite the opposite.”

As the only candidate this year to have served on the regional council before, Tindall’s stand is to make the October poll a full referendum on the role of democracy for reaching good and lasting public decisions.

“A great myth was created, that the elected ECan council was dysfunctional, that it suffered from tied votes. There was just a single vote that fell 7:7 in all the council’s 2007-2010 term, and even that was debatable on points of conflict of interest,” Tindall explains. “Government intervention was to tip the balance around public interest, for a council that was struggling with regulatory functions – unsuccessfully in their eyes.”

Government wanted quicker irrigation infrastructure development from Environment Canterbury in 2010, which has provided the yardstick for the council’s performance since.

“Large water takes are now fully monitored, which Canterbury can thank Commissioners and Government for seeing through,” Tindall says. “But the public really want their voices heard on the full range of water concerns without delay. They have significant ideas for change too.”

“Democracy, to be effective, must be real, consultative and studiously applied.”

ENDS

Contact: Rik Tindall, 03-332-1069, 027-406-0077, rik@infohelp.co.nzhttp://communityvoice.nz

Reportage: scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1609/S00187/christchurch-water-referendum
myinforms.com/en-au/a/41279151-christchurch-water-referendum/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s